Funerária abandonada tem caixões abertos, produtos químicos e macas pelo caminho

Este slideshow necessita de JavaScript.

EXCLUSIVE - Funeral Home Stunning images capture abandoned Funeral Home with Oak coffins,Cars and chemicals After being diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1851, Calvin Oak was told he would be dead within six months. Oak decided to move his family from Vermont to Jacksonville, Florida in hopes that a warmer, sunny environment would cure his ailment. Surrounded by fresh air, Calvin Oak lived another 30 years and became one of Jacksonville's most prominent businessmen. He built the first factory in the city, a gun plant that manufactured guns, barrels, and cartridges. Oak also purchased and operated a jewelry store on Bay Street. The power remains on although the funeral home has been abandoned for years. In 1856, Calvin Oak and his son, Byron, opened a marble and mortuary business. After his father passed away, Byron continued growing the business as the Moulton & Kyle Funeral Home. In 1914, Mark & Shetfall, a local architecture firm, was hired to design a two-story Prairie School style building at 17 West Union Street in downtown Jacksonville. Due to a high demand for parking, an attached garage was built several years later that featured a turntable, which allowed cars to drive in and turn around facing the street. Over the years, the funeral home became known as the Kyle McLellan Funeral Home after S.M. McLellan purchased the business. In the early 1990s, the funeral home was sold to the Peeples Family Funeral Home. After almost a century of operating at the West Union Street building, the business was moved in 2013 to a new location with updated facilities. The building at West Union Street was abandoned and left to decay. Today, the abandoned funeral home has a partially collapsed roof and stands at the mercy of the harsh Florida weather. ¿abandonedsoutheast.com/Exclusivepix media

Foto: Reprodução/Abandoned SouthEast

O Moulton & Kyle Funeral Home, que fica em é desses lugares que causam arrepios na espinha só de passar pela frente. Uma rápida olhada nessas imagens do local abandonado pode dar uma ideia do clima tenso e mórbido que era (e ainda é) estar dentro do edifício. O complexo, que existe desde 1856, foi deixado às traças quando a empresa mudou-se para um local com instalações modernas. Quase tudo foi deixado como era

EXCLUSIVE - Funeral Home Stunning images capture abandoned Funeral Home with Oak coffins,Cars and chemicals After being diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1851, Calvin Oak was told he would be dead within six months. Oak decided to move his family from Vermont to Jacksonville, Florida in hopes that a warmer, sunny environment would cure his ailment. Surrounded by fresh air, Calvin Oak lived another 30 years and became one of Jacksonville's most prominent businessmen. He built the first factory in the city, a gun plant that manufactured guns, barrels, and cartridges. Oak also purchased and operated a jewelry store on Bay Street. The power remains on although the funeral home has been abandoned for years. In 1856, Calvin Oak and his son, Byron, opened a marble and mortuary business. After his father passed away, Byron continued growing the business as the Moulton & Kyle Funeral Home. In 1914, Mark & Shetfall, a local architecture firm, was hired to design a two-story Prairie School style building at 17 West Union Street in downtown Jacksonville. Due to a high demand for parking, an attached garage was built several years later that featured a turntable, which allowed cars to drive in and turn around facing the street. Over the years, the funeral home became known as the Kyle McLellan Funeral Home after S.M. McLellan purchased the business. In the early 1990s, the funeral home was sold to the Peeples Family Funeral Home. After almost a century of operating at the West Union Street building, the business was moved in 2013 to a new location with updated facilities. The building at West Union Street was abandoned and left to decay. Today, the abandoned funeral home has a partially collapsed roof and stands at the mercy of the harsh Florida weather. ¿abandonedsoutheast.com/Exclusivepix media

As macas utilizadas para transportar os corpos que chegavam ainda estão lá

EXCLUSIVE - Funeral Home Stunning images capture abandoned Funeral Home with Oak coffins,Cars and chemicals After being diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1851, Calvin Oak was told he would be dead within six months. Oak decided to move his family from Vermont to Jacksonville, Florida in hopes that a warmer, sunny environment would cure his ailment. Surrounded by fresh air, Calvin Oak lived another 30 years and became one of Jacksonville's most prominent businessmen. He built the first factory in the city, a gun plant that manufactured guns, barrels, and cartridges. Oak also purchased and operated a jewelry store on Bay Street. The power remains on although the funeral home has been abandoned for years. In 1856, Calvin Oak and his son, Byron, opened a marble and mortuary business. After his father passed away, Byron continued growing the business as the Moulton & Kyle Funeral Home. In 1914, Mark & Shetfall, a local architecture firm, was hired to design a two-story Prairie School style building at 17 West Union Street in downtown Jacksonville. Due to a high demand for parking, an attached garage was built several years later that featured a turntable, which allowed cars to drive in and turn around facing the street. Over the years, the funeral home became known as the Kyle McLellan Funeral Home after S.M. McLellan purchased the business. In the early 1990s, the funeral home was sold to the Peeples Family Funeral Home. After almost a century of operating at the West Union Street building, the business was moved in 2013 to a new location with updated facilities. The building at West Union Street was abandoned and left to decay. Today, the abandoned funeral home has a partially collapsed roof and stands at the mercy of the harsh Florida weather. ¿abandonedsoutheast.com/Exclusivepix media

Foto: Reprodução/Abandoned SouthEast

Caixões jazem abandonados por toda a parte. Vazios, para a sorte dos curiosos que visitam o local

4ab86jr38i_2xay99nbjc_file

Foto: Reprodução/Abandoned SouthEast

Até mesmo um carro fúnebre, um Cadillac, foi deixado para trás

1wcpee568j_1lh655sm5v_fileAs paredes mofaram ao longo das décadas, mas a eletricidade ainda está em pleno funcionamento

7tln8t1mm5_6vxxv1phwk_file

Foto: Reprodução/Abandoned SouthEast

Produtos químicos bastante perigosos também foram deixados para trás na sala onde os corpos eram embalsamados

EXCLUSIVE - Funeral Home Stunning images capture abandoned Funeral Home with Oak coffins,Cars and chemicals After being diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1851, Calvin Oak was told he would be dead within six months. Oak decided to move his family from Vermont to Jacksonville, Florida in hopes that a warmer, sunny environment would cure his ailment. Surrounded by fresh air, Calvin Oak lived another 30 years and became one of Jacksonville's most prominent businessmen. He built the first factory in the city, a gun plant that manufactured guns, barrels, and cartridges. Oak also purchased and operated a jewelry store on Bay Street. The power remains on although the funeral home has been abandoned for years. In 1856, Calvin Oak and his son, Byron, opened a marble and mortuary business. After his father passed away, Byron continued growing the business as the Moulton & Kyle Funeral Home. In 1914, Mark & Shetfall, a local architecture firm, was hired to design a two-story Prairie School style building at 17 West Union Street in downtown Jacksonville. Due to a high demand for parking, an attached garage was built several years later that featured a turntable, which allowed cars to drive in and turn around facing the street. Over the years, the funeral home became known as the Kyle McLellan Funeral Home after S.M. McLellan purchased the business. In the early 1990s, the funeral home was sold to the Peeples Family Funeral Home. After almost a century of operating at the West Union Street building, the business was moved in 2013 to a new location with updated facilities. The building at West Union Street was abandoned and left to decay. Today, the abandoned funeral home has a partially collapsed roof and stands at the mercy of the harsh Florida weather. ¿abandonedsoutheast.com/Exclusivepix mediaFoto: Reprodução/Abandoned SouthEast

O prédio está abandonado há três anos. Pouco tempo, mas as paredes e tudo o que restou lá tem sido devastado pelo clima úmido e subtropical da cidade